Monday, March 17, 2008

Wine 1.0 Release Criteria updated

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2 comments:

Anonymous said...

I don't understand the GSOC concerns. After freeze the new contributions go into a devel branch while the trunk is restricted to fixes. Once the release happens some (or all) of the devel branch gets merged into the trunk. After a while the 1.1 freeze gets declared. Rinse and repeat. Nothing gets lost, but there will ALWAYS be people who's contributions get deferred via the devel branch for the next feature release. All production products use some variation on this system, and I think that the Linux kernel is an excellent example. (linux-mm and linux-next can be considered the devel branch).

Anonymous said...

Flashback:: In the year 2000:

"Interview: Corel's Linux VP on the Microsoft deal"
http://archives.cnn.com/2000/TECH/computing/10/16/corel.linux.on.ms.idg/index.html

"LinuxWorld: With the recent investment by Microsoft, many people in the Linux community are concerned about your various Linux projects getting derailed. What effect will there be on your Linux ambitions?
Rene Schmidt: Essentially, with Linux, we are very committed to it. And the agreement, or partnership, or alliance, whatever you want to call it, with Microsoft is not anti-Linux or anything. It is really about .Net. It is really about the Web.... [Linux is] not really any different than any other platform, whether it is a Macintosh platform or a Windows platform that provides services through the application. So from our point of view it is not something that hampers what we are doing on Linux. In fact, it provides new opportunities in Linux."

"LinuxWorld: Will you continue to work with and support the Wine project, and will you continue to use Wine to bring your traditionally Windows applications to Linux?
Rene Schmidt: Yeah, currently we have WordPerfect and CorelDraw, we've done those two main suites. Where we are right now is that those are two main investments at this point, and what we are doing is we are looking at the desktop market on Linux and trying to expand it as well.
It will be based really on customer demand; that is what is going to drive us in terms of what we do next on applications for Linux. In terms of Wine itself, we still support it; we have been working with the community to come up with a 1.0 version of Wine and we are hoping that that is going to allow a lot of other ISVs to move their applications more rapidly over to Linux."

HHAHAAHAHAHAHHAAAHAHAAHAH version 1.0 in the year 2000, we see what Microsoft brings Linux when it comes to interoperability, NOTHING!

Thanks to Google Wine 1.0 is well on the way.